5 years and a Woodmaster — FAMILY BUILDS THEIR OWN EXTRAORDINARY OFF-THE-GRID HOME

Eric Esiason purchased the plans and logs. Then he and his family started a 5-year project to build this beautiful home with their own hands. They cut their own trees and made all the flooring and trim with Eric's Woodmaster Molder/Planer.

Eric Esiason purchased the plans and logs. Then he and his family started a 5-year project to build this beautiful home with their own hands. They cut their own trees and made all the joists, flooring, and trim — plus log cabin siding for their garage — with Eric’s Woodmaster Molder/Planer.

Eric Esiason ran thousands of board feet through his Woodmaster Molder/Planer. Here he's planing oak trim for the new home he and his family built.

Eric Esiason ran thousands of board feet through his Woodmaster Molder/Planer. Here he’s planing oak trim for the new home he and his family built.

Here’s the story of what may be the ultimate D-I-Y project. Woodmaster owner, Eric Esaison, his wife, Linda, and their two teenage sons took on the massive task of building their own off-the-grid home from scratch on 60 undeveloped acres in Massachusetts.

Central to this gigantic project was Eric’s Woodmaster Molder/Planer. He and his family cut their own trees, sawed them into lumber, and created THOUSANDS of board feet of flooring, siding, and trim.

Eric and his two sons, Justin and Jordan, install decking on the home they built from scratch.

Eric and his two sons, Justin and Jordan, install decking on the home they built from scratch.

“I’m an IT guy (information technology) and a serious do-it-yourselfer. I’ve always wanted to build a log home and in 2007 my wife and I bought 60 wooded acres near Sturbridge, Massachusetts. We decided to build our log home ourselves. With five years of hard work and a Model 725 Woodmaster Molder/Planer, we built our own very private 4,500 square foot log home at the end of a ¾ of a mile driveway. We call it the coolest home nobody will ever see!

“Woodmaster can handle big volume, big projects”

I got the planer specifically to make finished lumber for our home. Finished boards are expensive; we had 60 acres of woodland and I knew we could make our own lumber and trim with the right equipment. We saved hundreds of dollars on red oak trim. Besides saving money, you just can’t buy the custom materials we made ourselves. We ran my Woodmaster pretty much continuously during the building process.

It paid for itself in no time and cost us nothing beyond the initial purchase price. It’s one of the few woodworking machines that could take the volume of wood I put through it. Woodmaster’s how-to videos are great, a real big help. This machine doesn’t have a big price tag and it does great work. I chose Woodmaster because it has a really good reputation. I did a lot of Googling and read a lot of product reviews. I never saw even one negative comment. I totally concur with everything I read online. This machine is absolutely stellar.

I ran a ton of wood through it! It’s done everything I wanted it to do. We built the road, a bridge, the house, a big garage, and more. We cleared the land, cut trees, sawed them into boards, surfaced them on my 725 Woodmaster Molder/Planer, and used the finished lumber and trim to build our new home.

“Here’s what we did with my Model 725 Woodmaster…”

wood comes outWe made the 5/4” x 14” fascia trim around the roof line from our white pine trees. We manufactured 2” x 6” tongue and groove floor boards for the loft from our hemlock trees. We made roughly 1,000 1” x 8” x 14” T & G white pine boards for the ceilings, cut from white pines that were knocked down in a tornado that went through the Sturbridge area in June of 2011. We created all the interior window and door trim from a couple of 200 year old red oaks that were removed from the house site. We made the mantle over the fireplace. It’s a 4” x 12” hunk of the same red oak. We sided our new 24’ x 32’ garage with log cabin siding we made on the Woodmaster. And our next project will be sawing wide oak planks for the main floor. And we’ll surface them, of course, on my Woodmaster!

Solar panels help make the Esiason's new home self sufficient. They're totally off the grid.

Solar panels help make the Esiason’s new home self sufficient. They’re totally off the grid.

Totally Off The Grid

We’re totally off the grid. The only wire connecting us to the outside world is 3,200’ of armored fiber optic cable we use to access the internet. We have a wood furnace, a 12,000 watt solar array, a 2,000 watt windmill, and a big bank of storage batteries. We generate our own electricity, heat, and hot water. Since we moved into our new home in 2012 we’ve paid $0 for utilities.

Ordinary folks, extraordinary undertaking

We are homeowners and do-it-yourselfers, not professional builders. I was the general contractor. My wife Linda and I, with our two sons, Justin and Jordan, were the building crew. Logs came from a company in Maine. I hired local companies to put in the foundation; plumbing, and septic; and assemble the log building shell. We did everything else!

There’s a big benefit to doing a big building project like this: it’s a great opportunity to buy big boy toys. I bought a sawmill, a bulldozer, tractor, an all-terrain forklift, and a Woodmaster Molder/Planer!

Our home’s joists are all 3 x 12 hemlock. There are 2,000 individual 14’ 1” x 8” white pine boards. A tornado came through here and we salvaged downed trees. The decking in the loft is 1” x 6” tongue and groove hemlock; the loft floor forms the ceiling of the kitchen and bathroom on the first floor. All the fascia boards are 5/4 x 12” white pine. All the interior trim is cut from 200 year old red oaks.

“I got the biggest Woodmaster — price difference between models is not that much”

I got the biggest Woodmaster Molder/Planer, the 725, for its capability. I wanted to be sure the model I chose would do everything I wanted. The price difference between the big 725 Woodmaster I bought and a smaller Woodmaster is not that much money. I also got the 3-Side Molding System and used it for all the tongue and groove work. The Woodmaster saved me tens of thousands of dollars.

Eric's whole story

Trouble free
Woodmaster’s a great tool, I have nothing but good things to say about it. It’s important to me that it’s made in the USA — that influenced my decision to buy one. Foreign-made machines don’t hold up, and I like to keep my dollars in America. The only thing I’ve bought for my Woodmaster is a new set of knives.
My advice for others? Building your own home is doable and worth it if you’re willing to invest time and sweat. With the power of today’s internet, there’s really nothing you can’t figure out how to do if you really want to. If you want to build your own home, fear nothing and plan on it taking a long time!”
— Eric Esiason, Woodmaster Owner & one serious D-I-Y’er, Massachusetts
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He turned his passion for surfing into a UNIQUE & PROFITABLE WOODWORKING BUSINESS

Dana's wife, Lisa, (front) and her friend, Emily, strike lovely poses for promotional photos on Dana's beautiful hand crafted wooden surfboards.

Dana’s wife, Lisa, (left) and her friend, Emily, strike lovely poses on Dana’s beautiful hand crafted wooden surfboards.

Dana's Koa surfboard is a prime example of the excellent craftsmanship that can be achieved with Woodmaster Molder/Planers and Drum Sanders.

Dana’s surfed half his life. When career opportunities led him to a crossroad, he started manufacturing surfboards. Dude!

Five years ago Californian, Dana Blocksage, got laid off from his job as a territorial sales manager and wondered, “What’s next?” He wanted to do something that was both enjoyable and meaningful. Having been a California surfer half his life, Dana did what came naturally: he started building surfboards under his own brand name – Dana Surfboards.

“My wife, Lisa, and I started manufacturing surfboards out of a garage. Today, business is great and we have a 2,000 square foot shop. We make two kinds of surfboards: solid wood, decorative boards and hollow, functional ones you can surf with. We own a 25″ Woodmaster Molder Planer, and a 38″ Woodmaster Drum Sander.

Dana's koa wood surfboard is a prime example of the aesthetic beauty that can be achieved with the Woodmaster Molder/Planer and Drum Sander.

Dana’s koa wood surfboard is a prime example of the aesthetic beauty that can be achieved with the Woodmaster Molder/Planer and Drum Sander.

2 surfboard lines – decorative and functional

"Please be sure to sign our...surfboard!" Guest books are so yesterday. Guests at weddings and affairs sign  one of Dana's surfboards.

“Please be sure to sign our…surfboard!” Guest books are so yesterday. Guests at weddings and affairs sign Dana’s surfboards.

Our decorative surfboards are beautiful to hang on the wall. Many are used at weddings — guests sign the surfboard like a guest book. We also make surfboard furniture: surfboard shelves, bookcases, coffee tables, and more. Our clients are surfers and non-surfers. We’ve done work for big corporations, foundations, Fortune 500 companies, and more. Anything surfboard-related, we’ve made it and people are buying it. Business is great. We’re getting orders every day and shipping around the world. We’re constantly adding products to our lines. We’ve been very blessed.

We also make functional, hollow wooden surfboards you can surf with. These are very time consuming and very expensive. They have a rib structure inside with a quarter-inch thick wood skin top and bottom. We run the skins through our Woodmaster Molder/Planer and Woodmaster Drum Sander. We glue them to the top and bottom of the surfboards, add rails, hand-shape them, and fiberglass them.

Only 5% of the boards we build are hollow, functional surfboards. Most are solid Redwood decorative surfboards. An eight-foot hollow, fiberglassed wooden surfboard is around $1,500. An eight-foot, solid wood decorative surfboards goes for $429.

Renewable Redwood from managed forests

This is one guest book that will never get tucked in the back of a drawer!

This is one guest book that will never get tucked in the back of a drawer!

Wooden surfboards go back to the 1800’s in Hawaii. They were often made of Koa, a wood that’s native to Hawaii. We use Redwood that’s native to California. All the Redwood we use is grown in managed forests and is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council. We start by hand-selecting all our lumber. We accept only about 20% of the wood we look at. We laminate our solid wood surfboards from Redwood boards with narrow, lighter colored wood ‘stringers’ in between.

Then we run the laminated wood through our Woodmaster Molder/Planer, cut the profile, and add the rails — the sidepieces. Then we add the nose and tail details — nose and tail ‘blocks’ made from a variety of exotic hardwoods fromaround the world. Next, we run the surfboard through our Woodmaster Drum Sander. We do a final palm sanding and put on a water based polyurethane finish. Finally we add the fin and ship it out.

Early hassles ‘til he got his 26” Molder/Planer

A southern California bar wouldn't complete without Dana's stand-up surfboard bar tables.

A southern California bar wouldn’t complete without Dana’s stand-up surfboard bar tables.

We started with a narrow benchtop planer and I had to make surfboards in two halves, lengthwise, then join the halves together. That was too time consuming. Then I found a woodworker about 75 miles away who would plane whole laminated surfboard blanks for me. I’d take 20 or so up to him every couple of weeks and he’d plane them.

I got to the point where we had some money and it made sense to get a planer of our own. I chose Woodmaster because I liked the price, the customer reviews, and that it’s made in the United States. I called Woodmaster and the reps were friendly, they had good financing, and I liked the five-year warranty. I thought about getting a used planer off craigslist but I figured a new one fit my needs better because of the 5-year warranty.

Paid for itself in gas money saved

Ever see a memorial plaque like this one? Dana's boards are popular among businesses and organizations to commemorate events and accomplishments.

Ever see a memorial plaque like this one? Dana’s boards are popular among businesses and organizations — they use them to commemorate events and accomplishments.

The 725 Woodmaster Molder/Planer paid for itself as we used it. When we considered we’d no longer have to pay for gas to drive 75 miles each way to have our boards planed, we figured our planer paid for itself. But even more than that, it was great to be able to plane on our schedule, not when another guy was ready for us. I chose the 725 because most of our surfboards are 24” wide so this was the right size. For my purpose, it’s very good. I have two sets of planer knives. I send in my dull ones to be sharpened and mount my sharp ones.

Multi-tasking with his Woodmaster Drum Sander

I have a 38” Woodmaster Drum Sander, too. Sanding is the last step before the boards are finished. I got it with the Reversing Switch. I love it; I couldn’t imagine sanding without being able to send the wood through the machine, then flip the switch and bring it back. I sit in a chair beside the planer and run the wood back and forth while I’m on my smartphone checking orders, updating our Facebook page, emailing customers, and so on. I have a mask on, my ear protection, and do some multi-tasking.

We used to use a disk sander. It created a huge amount of dust and didn’t give a uniform finish. The Woodmaster is a lot less work and it creates a better finish. I can change the feed rate to match the wood I’m running. Both the planer and sander are very powerful machines.

Thousands less than others

Woodworkers talk about "putting their mark" on their work. Dana does exactly that. His remarkable wooden surfboards bear his logo -- Dana Surfboards.

Woodworkers talk about “putting their mark” on their work. Dana does exactly that. His remarkable wooden surfboards bear his mark, his logo — Dana Surfboards.

I don’t see how other woodworking equipment companies can justify their prices. Some are several thousand dollars more than Woodmaster. Even so, buying two Woodmasters was quite an investment. But now that we have them, my wife and I ask ourselves all the time, ‘Why didn’t we do this sooner?” These machines let me do more than surfboards. I’ve made big conference tables and I’ve run work for others. A local hardwood supplier just asked us if we would do milling work. People call us for small jobs. These things aren’t our core business but I’m happy to help others and make a few dollars.

If someone’s thinking about getting a Woodmaster, I’d say it depends on where you are in your business or your hobby. Me, I’m the kind of guy who’d start
small with Harbor Freight equipment, then maybe buy a bigger, better, used machine. But looking back, I wish I’d bought Woodmaster equipment from the start. Woodmaster machines are not inexpensive, but they’re a lot less than others. Customer service has been good. If somebody wants to buy a planer or sander and are looking for something in this size, I would feel comfortable recommending Woodmaster based on my own experience.”

— Dana Blocksage, Dana Surfboards, Woodmaster Molder/Planer & Woodmaster Drum Sander Owner

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WOODMASTER HALL OF FAME — Top OWNER SUCCESS STORIES from the Woodmaster Molder/Planer Blog

Mike W. had never run a molder/planer before. How'd he get the crazy idea he could manufacture his new home's flooring and trim himself and save thousands in the process? By reading Woodmaster Owner Stories. He read...he learned...he ran his own flooring. And, yes, he saved thousands of dollars doing it.

Mike W. had never run a molder/planer before. How’d he get the crazy idea he could manufacture his new home’s flooring and trim himself and save thousands in the process? By reading Woodmaster Owner Stories. He read…he learned…he ran his own flooring. And, yes, he saved thousands of dollars doing it. Read full story

You may be visiting our Woodmaster Molder/Planer blog for the very first time, or you may have read every one of the 40+ stories we’ve ever posted on our molder/planer blog. Either way, we want to share our TOP STORIES with you. These are not just our our most popular, most read stories. They also represent the breadth and diversity of our Owners.

Some woodworkers in our Woodmaster Hall of Fame bought their Woodmasters to speed production and increase quality. Many bought them so they could increase their woodworking incomes. Some are in it to save money by making flooring and trim for themselves. Some have a lifetime of woodworking experience under their belts. Others are relatively new to woodworking. Some bought a Woodmaster because it’s made in America; others found it was a practical and affordable alternative to industrial molders and planers.

But all these good folks have at least three things  in common. First, each one is a dedicated, hands-on woodworker who is deeply involved in this age-old craft. Second, each of these woodworkers is ingenious and highly talented in his or her own way. And third, every one of them shopped around, considered all kinds of equipment options, and ended up choosing Woodmaster. Below, you’ll find excerpts from their stories. Simply click on the “READ FULL STORY”  link at the end of each story and you’ll go immediately to the full stories on our blog. Enjoy reading!

Bill & Andy McQuatters — EVEN IN THE FACE OF ADVERSITY

Bill McQuatters, right, started a woodworking business with his son, for the benefit of his autistic son's long range future. Andy handles the work well and "he works all day long," says Bill.

Bill McQuatters, right, started a woodworking business with his son, for the benefit of his autistic son’s long range future. Andy handles the work well and “he works all day long,” says Bill.

Bill McQuatters and his son, Andy, have started a busy and profitable business with help from their Woodmaster Molder/Planer. Bill tells his story. “Andy is autistic, but I describe him as special. While I was employed, Andy went to sheltered workshops but when I retired, I kept him home with me. Keeping him busy, with a purpose, presented quite a challenge. I worried about what would happen to Andy after my wife and I die. Today, we’re building a business and a future for my son with God’s help. Andy and I are making a living with two Woodmaster Molder/Planers set up as gang ripsaws. We make stakes for construction, surveying, and nurseries. Even in today’s economy, business  has just exploded.” READ FULL STORY…

 

Mike Crowder — “I MADE $96,000 LAST YEAR MANUFACTURING MOLDING AND SELLING IT ONLINE”

Mike Crowder's a young man earning some big bucks making molding with his Woodmaster Molder/Planer. If Mike can do it, you can, too!

Mike Crowder’s a young man earning some big bucks making molding with his Woodmaster Molder/Planer. If Mike can do it, you can, too!

Mike Crowder manufactures molding and trim with his Woodmaster and sells it online. His success surprised him at first. “It was a shocker that eBay would work so well for me,” he says. Mike’s bread and butter is 3-1/4” crown molding. When that took off, he added almost two dozen other profiles. One of his most popular profiles is 3” fluted casing. “It sells like hotcakes,” Mike says. “I sell it in casing sets: two legs, a header, and two rosettes as a set. You can get more money for the sets than you can for just the straight runs.” READ FULL STORY…

 

Larry & Chris Perkins — SELF-EMPLOYED FATHER & SON MAKING GOOD MONEY — UP TO $100 AN  HOUR

The Perkins family took a couple hard hits recently. But they've bounced back: father and son run a woodworking shop together now and knock down some good money.

The Perkins family took a couple hard hits recently. But they’ve bounced back: father and son run a woodworking shop together now and knock down some good money.

Adversity hit the Perkins family of New Philadelphia, Ohio pretty hard over the past few years. First, Mrs. Perkins passed away. Then, the local steel mill closed down. There went Larry Perkins job — the one he’d held for over 30 years. The Perkins are a close family and son, Chris, had a bright idea. “I had a Woodmaster 718 Molder/Planer I’d bought a few years earlier,” Chris told us. “Dad was looking for other work and I started thinking we could put the Woodmaster to work.” Now they work together and are making good money. “Being a small operation – just me and my dad – we can afford to have low prices. We have a nice niche.” 3 Star Molding is two men and two Woodmasters — Chris’s original 718 and a 712. “When we started, we saw we were going to need another Woodmaster. Dad will run wood through one Woodmaster and I’ll flip it and run the other side through our other Woodmaster. Then we put it on the forklift, wrap it up, and load it on the trailer.” READ FULL STORY…

 

Elizabeth Floyd — SHE’S PLANNING HER RETIREMENT INCOME WITH A WOODMASTER 

Elizabeth Floyd has plans to develop her burgeoning woodworking business into an income-generator for her retirement. She does beautiful work!

Elizabeth Floyd has plans to develop her burgeoning woodworking business into an income-generator for her retirement. She does beautiful work!

Elizabeth Floyd is planning ahead for her retirement income. “I work full time but do woodworking on weekends. When I retire, I want some income and if things go well with woodworking, I might retire earlier than planned. I’m the kind of person who sticks their toe in the water before jumping in. I want to see if there’s a market for my style of woodworking, and see if it would support me.If someone’s thinking of getting a Woodmaster, I’d tell them I have no complaints. It’s a quality piece of equipment that’s well built. The company is good. READ FULL STORY…

 

IT’S TIME TO BUY AMERICAN

Earl Bryam asked Mrs. B to step in for the photo he took. "It's hard to find equipment that's not made in China," he says.

Earl Bryam asked Mrs. B to step in for the photo he took. “It’s hard to find equipment that’s not made in China,” he says.

We trust you know it already, but just in case you’ve missed this fact: a great deal of the woodworking equipment you’ll find in discount catalogs and on the shelves at big box stores is made in the Far East. Overwhelmingly, manufacturers in this part of the world build equipment to lower quality standards and with lesser materials than you’ll find in premium USA-made equipment. Read several short stories by Woodmaster Owners who say, “I want to keep my money in America.” READ FULL STORY…

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HIS BUSINESS SUCCESS SECRET? Thrift and 2 Woodmaster Molder/Planers

Gene Vickers’ Woodmaster equipment is a key part of his success strategy. “I’m frugal and make my own molding with my Woodmaster. In the recent past, other shops bought molding and are out of business. It’s just simple economics.” 

Gene Vickers & his Woodmasters

Gene Vickers’ success strategy is simple: work hard, do quality work, and control costs. His two Woodmasters play a big part in helping him succeeed. When he needs molding, he makes it himself with his Woodmaster Molder/Planers.

 Thrift…frugality…good decision-making…and hard work: that’s what has helped business-savvy woodworkers like Gene Vickers make a success of his cabinetry business.

His Woodmaster Molder/Planers are an important part of Gene’s success plan. His two machines have helped him control costs and increase profit margins. Gene spent money to make money, and his wise investments in quality equipment paid for themselves fast and earned him thousands of dollars more.

“I started as an interior trim carpenter and moved into building and installing cabinets. Today, I own a small cabinet company in south Georgia. I build commercial, industrial, and residential cabinetry. Before I got my Woodmasters, I had to outsource all my moldings. I’d buy from a lumberyard and end up short a piece, or there’d be a knot, and I’d have to wait for another shipment to get more.

I bought a Woodmaster 12” Woodmaster Molder/Planer and used it as a planer and to make face frames. Then I got the 25” Woodmaster and I put a molding head on it. With a 25” head, I can have four or five sets of pattern knives, different patterns, side by side. I can make up to five molding patterns with one setup — I can make crown moldings or chair rail and so on without having to change knives.

4 profiles with 1 setup

Gene’s 25″ Woodmaster 725 Molder/Planer can actually accommodate four or five different setups at the same time. He runs the molding he needs, as he needs it, with no changeovers. Big time saver!

Woodmaster has really benefited my business. Now, when I need a piece of molding, I can just make it on the spot. It saves me time and energy. And it lets me get the job done so I can get paid. And that’s what I’m in business for, to make a dollar. I order my pattern knives from Woodmaster. I use a lot of stock pattern knives but it’s nice that Woodmaster can make custom knives, too. I call and order them and I have them within two or three days.

Managing expenses increases profitability

My business weathered the storm of the bad economy by managing our expenses. There were once a lot of cabinet shops in my neighborhood; many are no longer in business. I was frugal and made my own molding — others bought molding and are out of business. It’s just simple economics.

I paid for my Woodmaster equipment when I bought it. I got a Woodmaster Spiral Cutterhead. It’s not cheap; you’re talking about $1,200. But I’ve earned many thousands of dollars with it. It’s a very worthwhile investment. Plus, it’s quieter and does a better job than planer knives.

I do think the economy is getting better. We had a tough winter but it’s picking up this spring and summer. We’re going to have a very productive fall season. Of course, nobody can tell the future but if you do good quality work, with good molding, and do what you say you’re going to do, you have a good advantage in the marketplace. As the economy continues to get better, and we stay busy, I’ll probably get another Woodmaster Molder/Planer.

2 motors – separate power to cutterhead and feed rate

I had a Williams & Hussey planer. It had just one speed controlling both the cutterhead and the feed rate. It worked fine on poplar but not on hickory. To run hardwoods, I’d have to slow the feed rate down. When I did that, it slowed down the cutterhead, too. The Woodmaster is set up differently to get the best possible results in any wood: you have two motors, one powering the cutterhead and the other powering the feed rate. Cutterhead speed is constant; you can dial the feed rate from 0 to 16 feet per minute.  This allows you to feed all woods at the speed you need to get best results.

 

Gene's shop

Gene says he builds and installs a set of cabinets every week. That’s a lot of cabinets. His Woodmasters help make this possible by helping him work at maximum efficiency.

“Proven design, affordable, best thing for a small shop like mine.”

The reason I chose Woodmaster was its proven design. I had friends who showed me what it could do and the machine really sold itself. I think I’ve sold two machines by showing mine to others. It sells itself; it’s a good design.

Woodmaster advertises, manufactures, sells, and services a good product. I pick up the phone and they always have good follow through. I like that it’s affordable. It’s the best thing for a small shop like mine. My shop is about 8,000 square feet and we build and install a set of cabinets every week. I have to make payroll, have to pay bills. We’re two hours from a lumberyard! I must be able to make my own materials when I need them. When I need molding, for example, I need it right now.

Which Woodmaster model’s best? Gene compares all 3

If you run a small shop and are thinking about getting a Woodmaster, you may be satisfied with the 12” machine. The 18” gives you bigger capacity. But if you can afford the 25” Woodmaster, get it. You can have multiple setups at the same time. You can put a planer, molder, rip saw, or drum sander head in it.

Our Woodmasters paid for themselves in the first year, probably in the first six months. You can buy cheaper machines but you get what you pay for. If you want to make good products, get good machinery. Woodmaster competes with the best equipment. We use some of the best woodworking equipment on the market; put them side by side with the Woodmaster and Woodmaster’s every bit as good quality.

I do very little advertising; it’s mostly by word of mouth. I’ve got no website, no Facebook page, and I have all the work I can stand. I appreciate the opportunities to tell others about Woodmaster.”

— Gene Vickers, Alma, Georgia — Woodmaster Molder/Planer Owner

Want FREE info on Woodmaster Molder/Planers? Click here.

Watch Video — LEARN HOW TO MAKE CURVED MOLDING

Click here to watch Gary's video on  how to use the Woodmaster Molder/Planer to make pro-quality curved molding.

Click the video to watch Gary demonstrate how to use the Woodmaster Molder/Planer to make pro-quality curved molding.

Gary Striegler is a heavy-hitter. He's an expert woodworker who gladly shares his techniques with others. He's a contributor to Fine Homebuilding and Fine Woodworking magazines, and has a series of videos on our Woodmaster Tools website. Watch and learn!

Gary Striegler is a heavy-hitter. He’s an expert woodworker who gladly shares his techniques with others. He’s a contributor to Fine Homebuilding and Fine Woodworking magazines, and has a series of videos at WoodmasterTools.com.  Watch and learn!

Gary Striegler, of Fayetteville, Arkansas, is a highly-regarded woodworker, teacher, and author; a frequent contributor to Fine Woodworking and Fine Homebuilding magazines. Gary’s also a proud owner of a Woodmaster Molder/Planer.

Gary demonstrates using a simple jig to run his laminated, curved blank through the Woodmaster.

Gary demonstrates using a simple jig to run his laminated, curved blank through the Woodmaster.

 

“Woodmaster really changed the way I do woodworking,” he told us. “It set my career in the right direction. Making curved molding with the Woodmaster really separates me from my competition – it’s like a PhD in woodworking.”

Gary went on to say, “Thanks to my Woodmaster. What started as a hobby skyrocketed into a millwork business worth six figures a year!”

Gary’s gaining national fame as the “Guru of Curved Molding” that he makes with his Woodmaster. Read his article in the Jan. 04 issue of Fine Homebuilding Magazine where he reveals his secrets – “Laminating curved stain-grade casing.”

Gary's curved molding emerges from the Woodmaster ready for finishing.

Gary’s curved molding emerges from the Woodmaster ready for finishing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“My carpenter’s heart did  backflips” over curved stain-grade casing.

“When I saw my first piece of curved stain-grade casing, my carpenter’s heart did backflips. Many years of trial and error (OK, lots of error) have led me to the method I still use today. I use a Woodmaster Molder/Planer that retails for $1,500.” (Reprinted by permission of Fine Homebuilding.)

Watch Gary’s videos – learn how to make curved molding

Gary’s mastered the art of making high-quality, high-dollar curved molding using the Woodmaster Molder/Planer. And he’s been kind enough to let us shoot several videos of how he does it. Watch and learn: you could become a curved molding guru, too!

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“MAN SYNDROME” PAYS OFF FOR GEORGIA WOODWORKER — With 2 Woodmaster Molder/Planers, and a TimberKing Sawmill, he’s building a family business.

Woodworker, Scott Saylors, turns out miles of molding in his home workshop thanks to his Woodmaster 725 and 712 Molder/Planers.

Woodworker, Scott Saylors, turns out miles of molding in his home workshop thanks to his Woodmaster 725 and 712 Molder/Planers.

 

Georgian, Scott Saylors, told us recently how his “Man Syndrome” kicks in when he wants more and better woodworking equipment. But it’s paying off for Scott and his family: their family business is growing.

“I had a shaper and a friend who had a hardwood flooring business. I started making thresholds for him. I work on the road for the local utility company, four days on and four days off and I decided to take my woodworking business to the next level. I figured woodworking would pay really well my four days off and would make a nice second income.

I didn’t have 3-phase power in my shop so I couldn’t get a big planer without phase converters and so on. I got looking at the Woodmaster Molder/Planer. One thing that impressed me about the Woodmaster was the versatility. You have four machines in one in a very small footprint.

“Man Syndrome” kicks in

I looked at the 12” Woodmaster 712 but the “Man Syndrome” kicked in: I had to have the biggest and best. I figured I didn’t want the 712 because it’s too small. And I didn’t want the 18” 718 because it’s the middle of the road model. So I ended up ordering the biggest, 25” Woodmaster 725. And I got the ProPack, too.

Turns out I got this first Woodmaster right before the housing market crashed. But due to circumstances and the Grace of God, things started turning around and I started getting big orders. When the economy went down, I had been ready to sell the 725. But as orders came in, instead of selling it, I decided to expand and I got a second Woodmaster, the 12” 712 model.

A FAMILY AFFAIR! Scott and Angel Saylors work together in their home business. They're aided by 12-year old son, Garret. "We do this as a family," says Scott. "Me, my wife, and our 12-year old son. What part time job can you do that in?"

A FAMILY AFFAIR! Scott and Angel Saylors work together in their home business. They’re aided by their son, Garret. “We do this as a family,” says Scott. “Me, my wife, and our 12-year old son. What part time job can you do that in?”

Family business

I’ve set up a production line. I have the 712 set up as a standalone molder, and the 725 is set up as a gang ripsaw. Lumber comes in the door and I rip it into blanks on the 725. Then I stack it and feed the blanks into the 712 to make them into molding. Then I move the molding into what I call the warehouse area and bundle it and stack it up. When it’s time to deliver larger orders, I take them out through a rollup door and load it onto my one-ton flatbed. We do this as a family: me, my wife, and our 12-year old son. What part time job can you do that in?

Small machine handles deep cuts

My hat’s off to Woodmaster. Even though these are smaller machines, they’re still able to handle the larger, deeper profiles. I’ve had special orders for 3” quarter round and 3” half round. I put the wood on the Woodmaster and it handles cutting 1-1/2” deep. It’s impressive. I’ve started making shoe molding using setups to cut four blanks at a time. I modified the Super-Slick Bedboard that came in the ProPack with some spacers and longer bolts and tweaked it into a setup I use for shoe molding.

I run a lot of really deep casings and profiles. You can slow the machine down, run it at a slow pace, and cut deep profiles in one pass. The molding comes out really smooth. I wasn’t sure it would be smooth because, with the shaper I was used to, you’d get chatter marks. It’s impressive that small machines will do such a big job. I can give my customers the same quality work as someone with a big machine.

“Wood & More” business – flooring, molding, service, and more

I’m making flooring and molding out of heart pine, red oak, poplar, hickory, walnut, and maple. I made some Brazilian cherry molding, plus MDF molding. I’ve made flooring 5” and 8” wide, some of it with a 1-3/4” face. Older houses have narrow flooring like that.

Garrett gets into woodworking with one of the family's two Woodmasters...under Dad's close supervision, of course.

Garrett gets into woodworking with one of the family’s two Woodmasters…under Dad’s close supervision, of course.

I call my business “Wood & More” because I work with other materials like MDF. I was skeptical about molding MDF because the machine’s RPMs have to be slower than when you’re molding wood. The guys at Woodmaster told me it would do a good job and gave me the parameters I’d need to work within to turn out a good product, like using carbide blades for MDF. I didn’t have to go in blind and make a costly mistake. I’ve cut probably 65,000 linear feet of MDF molding.

Commercial & residential customers — very little advertising

My customers are a mix of commercial and residential. I sell to one flooring company and a hardwood supply that sells to the public. They send me a lot of odd and end jobs – 50 sq. ft. of flooring up to 10,000 – 15,000 linear foot jobs. I advertise every now and then on craigslist.com and sell to someone who’s looking to do something in their home as cheap as they can. A lot of it is word of mouth.

Custom pattern knives

If a job calls for a custom knife, I often have a customer pay for the knife and material, and I keep the knife. That gives me sets of knives I can use in the future and builds up my variety and help others at the same time. A lot of molding companies charge you a custom knife fee, charge you per cut, charge you running and materials, and before long it’s beyond the reach of where your normal, hardworking American.

Whenever I need something for my Woodmaster, or I’m at a loss on how to do something, I pick up the phone and call Woodmaster. The guys there have a plethora of knowledge about the machines and they always have an answer for me.

Scott and his son, Garrett, mill their own lumber on their TimberKing 1220 Sawmill. Many woodworkers find sawing is a great way to slash their lumber costs. And when they process their own wood further in their Woodmasters, they add value at every step.

Scott and his son, Garrett, mill their own lumber on their TimberKing 1220 Sawmill. Many woodworkers find sawing is a great way to slash their lumber costs. And when they process their own wood further in their Woodmasters, they add value at every step.

I always wanted to get a sawmill. That “Man Syndrome” set in again and I got a TimberKing Sawmill. I knew Woodmaster and TimberKing are sister companies. I got great customer service from Woodmaster and I knew I’d get it from TimberKing, too. New sawmills were out of my price range but I put it in the Good Lord’s hands. I came across a man who wanted to sell his TimberKing 1220 and I bought it. It was 14 years old and had sat out in the weather but with a little TLC it cuts straight and purrs like a kitten now.

My future plans? As in any business, I want to see it grow. I hope to build a small dry kiln and take trees from people’s trees from their yard and turn it into lumber. I hope one day this business is big enough to have a standalone shop and retail to the public. Nothing fancy of big, maybe give people a way to get away from big box stores without feeling like they have to be a contractor to get a good price. My father was in business for many years and I want to follow in his footsteps: serving the public and helping others.

Talk to Scott

I’d be willing to talk to people about my Woodmaster and TimberKing story. I’d explain to them the pros and the cons.

The biggest thing I support to the day I die is Woodmaster and TimberKing are made in America by American workers. That’s something that as a country we’re losing sight of. The craftsmanship Woodmaster puts in its machine is 100%. They put their heart and soul into it. I wouldn’t have any problem recommending anybody to purchase the machine. If you were to tell me you’re looking at buying a Woodmaster, and you’ve got the need for it, it’s money well spent.”

Editor’s Note: Many of our owners have volunteered to speak with folks who’d like to know their candid, hands-on experience with their Woodmasters. If you’d like to speak with Scott or another of our owners, please call us at 1-800-821-6651.

— Scott Saylors, Georgia, Woodmaster Molder/Planer & TimberKing Owner

FREE Woodmaster MOLDER/PLANER Info Kit — click here — DVD, brochures, sale prices, more!

 

Woodmaster Owner Wins Honorable Mention in National Cabinetmaking Competition

Kurt Zolman, Woodmaster Owner, recently won Honorable Mention in a prestigious national cabinetmaking design competition. Here's the centerpiece of his entry, "Celebrity Closet."

Kurt Zolman, Woodmaster Owner, recently won Honorable Mention in a prestigious national cabinetmaking design competition. Here’s the centerpiece of his entry, “Celebrity Closet.”

“Woodworking Network,” a national woodworking industry organization recently held its annual “Top Shelf Design Awards” Competition. Winners were announced during a gala awards reception at the Cabinets and Closets Expo in New Jersey. Woodmaster Molder/Planer owner, Kurt Zolman, owner of Zolman Fine Cabinetry of Cordova, Alabama won Honorable Mention for his project, “Celebrity Closet.” Kurt told us about this achievement, his business, and his Woodmaster.

“I subscribe to one of Woodworking Network’s industry newsletters about wood products, kitchens, baths and so on. It’s available to woodworkers free of charge. I opened one issue and saw there was an Expo coming up and also a design contest. This was good timing because we’d just finished an extensive closet installation. We took pictures and sent them in.

Kurt and his wife, Andrea, run Zolman Fine Cabinetry. This outstanding kitchen is from their Medallion Platinum Series.

Kurt and his wife, Andrea, run Zolman Fine Cabinetry. This outstanding kitchen is from their Medallion Platinum Series.

Shortly after, we were notified that we were finalists in our category. We were up against some amazing projects. I did notice that all but one or two other entries we were prefab installations: laminates and prefab cabinets. Our cabinetry is all hand built. My wife, Andrea, and I build everything in our shop, Zolman Fine Cabinetry. We built this closet cabinetry and installed it in a client’s new home addition. Installation was very challenging because of narrow passageways we had to fit cabinets through.”

In an online article, Michaelle Bradford, Managing Editor of several Woodworking Network publications, shared Kurt’s notes on his winning installation. “All hand made in our shop using cherry and birds eye maple, this 500 sq. ft. closet features two 4×9 islands with large dovetail drawers and soft close slides, a ‘shoe department’ accommodating 400 pairs, purse boxes with beveled glass, flat screen TV mounted to a hydraulic lift for concealment, two laundry bins, pull-out valet and belt rods and a small sink. The biggest challenge was the arch and make-up area which was the focal point of the design. We had to make sure the arch was proportionally sized for the room and leave enough leg room and for the sink and TV. I made the decision to use framed cabinets because of the size of the units, and to add that extra detail. All the moulding was made in our shop with our Woodmaster 25″ moulding machine and applied piece by piece using miter cuts on site. My wife did all the painting and glazing by hand for the carvings, appliques and moulding.” Read full article here.

“I wanted a challenge.”

Here's another Zolman kitchen installation from Kurt and Andrea's Medallion Platinum Series.

Here’s another Zolman kitchen installation from Kurt and Andrea’s Medallion Platinum Series.

Our shop is a 7,500 sq. ft. facility I’ve had for 20 years. We’re in a small town close to Birmingnam, Alabama where our clients are; that area has many high end homes. I used to do custom paintwork for boats and motorcycles, and restored old boats, so I acquired saws and woodworking equipment along the way. I eventually wanted new challenges and ran into someone who wanted their kitchen redone. I built the cabinetry and really enjoyed doing it. I ended up quitting my job and started my business in cabinetmaking. I visited other cabinet shops to see how others did their work. I got a lot of good ideas but I told myself I’d do it differently and better.

“I told myself I’d do it differently and better.”

I think it’s really a shame that the cabinets that are being installed in half-million dollar homes need replacing in just a few years because they’re just cheap prefab units that only look good on the outside. And the average homeowner just doesn’t know the difference. I set out to do it better. I decided I’d use a minimum of staples and fasteners. I use dado cuts, rabbet cuts, and various joinery techniques throughout. We use ¼” birch for cabinet backs, and we use UV birch — birch plywood that has a durable clear coat on it. I want my work to be a step above others. For finish work, we use conversion varnish instead of lacquer. We spray it on an it makes a finish like fine furniture.

Kurt Zolman fits a carved applique to a section of curved molding he made with his Woodmaster Molder/Planer.

Kurt Zolman fits a carved applique to a section of curved molding he made with his Woodmaster Molder/Planer.

The kitchen is the most important room in the home, the most used room. I get involved with clients when we’re doing designing a kitchen or other cabinetwork for them. Every new job is a fresh canvas for us. I envision their kitchen in my mind and pass my excitement along to them. That’s an edge we have in our business: we’re a small shop, we’re the owners, not a 10-man shop. We’re not afraid to take on unique, special jobs like the closet installation we entered in this contest.

“Better to get the Woodmaster and build it ourselves than try to find exactly what we wanted in stores.”

I got this Woodmaster Molder/Planer specifically to do this closet job. I told my client it would be better to buy the Molder/Planer and do the work ourselves rather than searching and trying to find exactly what we liked. I told him it would definitely pay for itself and it did. Woodmaster looked better than other machines I’d seen. It has more production capability and is better-built in general.

At first it was intimidating to run the Woodmaster, but once you understand how it all works, it’s very pleasant to work with and satisfying to use. I drew up the patterns for custom knives I wanted  using a computer drawing program. I sent the drawings to Woodmaster, they imported them into their system, sent me an approval file, then manufactured the knives. This Woodmaster was the best investment we made and the smartest production decision in this whole project.

A no-brainer

Once I did the research, I saw getting a Woodmaster is a no brainer. I took some time going through the Woodmaster website. I saw I could make curved molding; I read about the availability of custom knives; the production capacity of the machine; I saw I could get a Starter Kit of knives as a money saving bundle. I like that Woodmaster’s made in the USA; it’s got good customer support and no worries. It’s even easy to find replacement wearing parts like belts — you can get them at a good automotive store.

By getting a Woodmaster Molder/Planer, Kurt was able to build what his client wanted AND save him money.

By getting a Woodmaster Molder/Planer, Kurt was able to build what his client wanted AND save him money.

Coming up: Man Cave

I chose the 25″ Woodmaster 725  because I didn’t want to be limited by size, or wish later I’d bought a bigger one. My client has more work in mind — I’m making him a $10,000 mantlepiece with very intricate trim and carvings out of burled walnut. After that I’m building him a ‘man cave.’

Besides custom work like that, you can make a lot of money making quality molding; it’s hard to find quality molding to use in high end homes. Lowe’s or Home Depot are the only places to get molding. Everybody has the same problem – where to get good quality molding. If we never get another cabinet jobs, we could make a good living making molding. This machine prints money!

I’d tell others don’t hesitate to pull the trigger and buy a Woodmaster. It is everything you say it is. It’s a wonderful machine, easy to operate. Regardless of the model you choose, you’ll get the same support and satisfaction from owning a Woodmaster.” See Kurt and Andrea’s work on Facebook: Zolman Fine Cabinetry LLC.

— Kurt Zolman, Zolman Fine Cabinetry, Woodmaster Molder/Planer Owner

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“WOODMASTER’S VARIABLE FEED RATE is its key feature — it’s a real big deal.”

Here's woodworker and all-around do-it-yourselfer, Eddy Johnson, in his workshop with his Woodmaster Molder/Planer. Thanks, Eddy, for sharing your story with our readers!

Here’s woodworker and all-around do-it-yourselfer, Eddy Johnson, in his workshop with his Woodmaster Molder/Planer. Thanks, Eddy, for sharing your story with our readers!

The Woodmaster Molder/Planer is a heavy duty, pro-grade 4-in-1 woodworking machine — molder, planer, sander, saw. Many Woodmaster owners are professional woodworkers, cabinetmakers, molding manufacturers and so on. But plenty of do-it-yourself guys choose Woodmasters, too. They tell us that, after all, if they’re going to put the time and effort into home projects, they’d rather to them right with tools they can depend on. Eddy Johnson is one such D-I-Y guy. He tells his story…

“I’m a hobby woodworker. My house is full of stuff I made! I got my Woodmaster Molder/Planer because of the versatility of the different functions and its heavy-duty construction. Price entered into my decision but was not the deciding factor. I was looking for a machine that would do everything I wanted to do as long and hard as I wanted to do it. The Woodmaster does that for me.

“I use my Woodmaster for planing, rip sawing, and sanding.”

I use my Woodmaster to plane rough sawn lumber; I gang saw lumber with the ripsaw head; and I sand occasionally with the drum sander head. I don’t do drum sanding as much as the other functions, but it is nice to have it available. I feel it has paid for itself just by helping me make the stuff in my home.

I know I could make money with it. Right now I am so tied up with work that I don’t have enough time in the day to do it all.  I have the opportunity to have my Woodmaster make money for me now, just not the time to do it in.  If time allowed, I could make money with it on any given day. You can really earn a great living with it making molding. That would be the biggest moneymaker. We have a hardwood company here in town and they have three Woodmasters in. They do make a living with theirs.

Eddy ran quite a bit of trim for his home. Here's some of his work in process.

Eddy ran quite a bit of trim for his home. Here’s some of his work in process.

I looked at all the big planers that were on the market at the time I bought. Woodmaster was the most heavy-duty, the best value, and the best producer that I could see. The variable speed on the infeed and outfeed is a huge selling feature.  I’m not mass-producing projects; what I’m after is the highest quality available.  I slow it down and just let it creep through and the wood comes out planed beautifully.  I am not trying to plane a certain number of feet a minute to earn big money. I want to get the best finish available for whatever project I am working on.

“Woodmaster told me what I didn’t need.”

Woodmaster Tools is a wonderful company; I have never had a negative experience with them. When I purchased the machine, I spoke with a few people at Woodmaster. I didn’t really know at the time what I would need for the machine, what molding knives or what supplies. The guy I spoke with was real helpful. He gave me some tips about what I may need or didn’t need, what I shouldn’t invest in and what would be money well spent. He told me that if I figured out that I needed anything else, he would sell me what I needed at 15% off for the next year. That was really helpful. I thought everything worked out great.  I don’t know if I would say that I had a friend on the inside, but I at least had someone I could call up and ask questions.  He remembered me every time I called.

The Key Feature: Variable Feed Rate

Woodmaster's Infinitely Variable Feed Rate gives you 10X more cuts-per-inch than ANY other molder or planer - that means super-fine finishes no other planer or molder can match. Simply turn the dial and choose from 70 to over 1,000 CPI or anywhere inbetween. More CPI means a super smooth finish!

Woodmaster’s Infinitely Variable Feed Rate gives you 10X more cuts-per-inch than ANY other molder or planer – that means super-fine finishes no other planer or molder can match. Simply turn the dial and choose from 70 to over 1,000 CPI or anywhere inbetween. More CPI means a super smooth finish!

If someone asked me about getting a Woodmaster Molder/Planer, I would definitely recommend it.  There is no doubt about that.  The key feature is the variable speed infeed outfeed rollers.  That is a big deal.  Plus Woodmaster is not stingy on the horsepower in the motors. You get a minimum of a 5HP motor. Taiwanese machines just cant stand up to Woodmaster.  The benefits of this machine can be easily shown to anyone.

“I put high value on quality.”

Eddy shows off some of his handiwork - some elaborate window trim he made with his Woodmaster Molder/Planer.

Eddy shows off some of his handiwork – some elaborate window trim he made with his Woodmaster Molder/Planer.

When I bought my Woodmaster, I did a lot of research. It was the best machine at the best price.  I do put a pretty high value on quality.  As long as you have a good value for the money, I have no problem doing business with you. Woodmaster is a great value for the money.”

— Eddy Johnson, Woodmaster Owner, Florida

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“MY WIFE AND I BUILT OUR OWN HOME FROM SCRATCH” …with a Woodmaster Molder/Planer, a TimberKing Sawmill, and His help.

We Americans are an independent people — it’s in our blood. Family’s important, as is faith, and so is a strong desire to do things for ourselves using our own resources. These traditional American values are part of our national character and they run strong and deep in Vermonters like Eli and Kaylina Phoenix. 

Kaylina Phoenix ran flooring through their Woodmaster Molder/Planer. "She likes to get right in there," says her husband, Eli.

Kaylina Phoenix runs flooring through their Woodmaster Molder/Planer. “She likes to get right in there,” says her husband, Eli. “She runs our TimberKing sawmill, too.”

“My wife and I built our own home ourselves. We hired certain aspects, but Kaylina and I did everything else. I’m a Christian and I’m thankful to the Lord that he helped us through the project. I took a lot of work and about a year and three months but we’re moved in now. Doing work ourselves, I credit God with helping us make decisions and giving me the strength to work late nights and weekends; giving me the strength to build our home.

3 generations built their own homes

The Phoenix Family

Building their home was a family affair. On the job site, Kaylina holds son, Jace, while Eli holds daughter, Colette.

I’ve been in construction my whole life. I work for my dad’s roofing company; he started the company when I was 3 or 4. He built his own home and my grandpa built his home, too. He actually built four houses. So building my own home was something I’ve always thought about. I’ve seen how it’s done, and I accumulated many ideas over the years. I had a good idea of what I wanted to do. I had experience and access to tools and equipment.

We own 70 acres in Southern Vermont, a gift from my dear grandfather, Edwin Phoenix, who passed away in 2012. He bought an old farmhouse and 400 acres in Townshend, Vermont in 1958 so he could raise his family in the country. I was born and raised here. There’s no way we could have built our home like we did without the land and the resources it provided. The wood on our property is about 50% pine, 10% hemlock, and the balance is birch, maple, cherry, with a little bit of oak. For this project we used maple and cherry for the flooring, trim, and counters.

TimberKing sawmill & Woodmaster Molder/Planer work together

Eli bought a TimberKing 1220 sawmill to mill lumber from his own trees. "It did everything I needed it to do," he says. TimberKing and Woodmaster are sister companies out of Kansas City, Missouri.

Eli bought a TimberKing 1220 sawmill to mill lumber from his own trees. “It did everything I needed it to do,” he says. TimberKing and Woodmaster are sister companies out of Kansas City, Missouri.

I cut and felled the trees we used. We have a John Deere tractor with logging winch on the back. We went in the woods, skidded them out, and milled them ourselves on our 1220 TimberKing sawmill. I had someone else kiln dry the boards, then Kaylina and I planed them with our 718 Woodmaster Molder/Planer.

My TimberKing sawmill works great. I’ve had no issues at all. It set up nice, always works really well, cuts nice lumber as long as you keep a sharp blade on it. How precise? I cut boards 7/8”, roughcut, I plane them down and get 11/16” lumber, finished both sides. I lost only 3/16” planing down both sides of lumber. In sawing 3,500 feet of lumber, I had only one or two boards that didn’t come out right. They were right on the money and I was very happy about that.

The Phoenix place is shaping up as Eli glues up wide cherry boards he cut and planed into his kitchen counters.

The Phoenix place is shaping up as Eli glues up wide cherry boards he cut and planed into his kitchen counters.

I’m using the Woodmaster Molder/Planer to turn my own lumber into my own flooring, trim, counters and more. I wanted to do my own planing because I’m able to do what I need to do. It’s also a cost saving thing. I enjoy woodworking, and having a machine like this is a benefit. I’ll use it for life. I milled all my own lumber on my TimberKing and I finished it myself on my Woodmaster. If I sent the roughcut boards to someone, it would cost 20 or 30 cents a foot to plane them. This way I could plane as much as I need and if I needed a little more I could just make more. That gave me flexibility and eliminated one more step to getting it done the way I want it.  I like to do myself.

"Get ready for late nights and long weekends," says Eli. Here he's laying down hardwood flooring he made.

“Get ready for late nights and long weekends,” says Eli. Here he’s laying down hardwood flooring he made.

I got the Pro Pack with my Woodmaster and I made my own crown molding from pine and painted it. I made some out of cherry, too. It worked slick. I was impressed. I wasn’t sure what to think of it when I got it but it worked really well and made really nice molding. There’s no pulling, no chatter.  variable feed rate and feed rollers make it smooth molding. I have an old 15” planer that has just one speed. It tends to pull the grain. Woodmaster’s variable feed rate is really key because you can slow it right down. You have to go slow because, when you make molding, you’re taking off a lot of wood.

One molder does it all: 4-in-1 molder, planer, sander, saw

I chose Woodmaster because of its versatility. I researched Logosol and some other 4-head machines but they cost quite a bit more and WoodMaster has four functions in one: planing, molding, sanding, and sawing in the same machine. That made sense to me as homeowner and weekend woodworker: I don’ t need four or five $20,000 molding machines. One Woodmaster lets me set it up for whatever I need and change functions easily.

I bought the 718 model — 18” wide —  you can plane a lot of wide boards on that. I liked it for the width. And I got the ProPack because I wanted the capability to do both planing and molding.  I liked that idea of the rip saw and drum sanding features that are in the ProPack, too.

The 718 performs very well. I haven’t had any problems. I planed 12” oak, maple, and cherry on it and it did it beautifully. It’s a very powerful machine so it doesn’t bog down. The 5HP motor is big, you need that power for making molding.

“I’d like to start a molding business later on”

My Woodmaster has worked well for me and has done everything I needed it to do. If you’re looking for a machine that’ll do a lot of different things, it’s definitely the way to go. I would like to do a molding business later on, owing the Woodmaster opens that door for me. I could process and sell molding at lower prices than a lumberyard. Opens doors. If you enjoy woodworking and being able to plane and make molding, it’s a good machine.

“I saved money I didn’t have, both machines paid for themselves”

Both my TimberKing sawmill and my Woodmaster Molder/Planer hav paid for themselves. If you buy wide plank maple or cherry,  you’re paying maybe $10 to $15 a square foot. When you multiply that over 3,000 sq. ft., they’ve definitely paid for themselves.

Home Sweet Home — the Phoenix's hand-built home on 70 beautiful wooded acres in Southern Vermont. Inspired by his dad and granddad, Eli built it himself.

Home Sweet Home — the Phoenix’s hand-built home on 70 beautiful wooded acres in Southern Vermont. Inspired by his dad and granddad, Eli built it himself.

The way I look at it, I saved money I don’t have. We couldn’t have afforded to buy the materials I made myself. The flooring I made is worth probably $14 a sq. ft. I put down about 1000 sq. ft. of flooring and saved maybe $17,000 to $20,000 worth of flooring, trim, countertops, and lumber. The Woodmaster was around $3,000, and the TimberKing sawmill was about $4,000. I probably saved 60% to 70% by doing it myself with these machines. Plus there’s the pleasure of doing it  yourself. On top of that there’s leveraging my time and effort — sweat equity.

Late nights and long weekends

Is a man's home his castle? From the smile on Eli's face, we believe it is...especially when you've built it yourself.

Is a man’s home his castle? From the smile on Eli’s face, we believe it is…especially when he’s built it himself.

If anyone else is thinking of building a home while you’re working full time, as I did, you need to be prepared for late nights and long weekends. It’s a lot of work but it’s very satisfying to go from cutting the trees to putting down the flooring. That’s very satisfying to me. I like to see things thru the whole process from start to finish. There were times when I was putting down flooring and could recognize the wood from when I was cutting the trees. It’s also a learning experience. It’s very satisfying, but you have to be prepared to put in long hours to get the project finished. If you’re willing to put in time, sweat, and hard labor, it’s definitely worth it becuause in the end you have a home and you know what went into it.

Jace turns three in a few weeks and he's already a Woodmaster fan. We're betting he'll build a home of his own one day.

Jace turns three in a few weeks and he’s already a Woodmaster fan. We’re betting he’ll build a home of his own one day.

My wife encouraged me to buy the sawmill and molder/planer becaue she knows I like woodworking and because it would be a benefit to I’d have the machines after we finished the house. That helped justify the purchases. She was right out there running the mill, planing wood, she was in the woods helping me do logging, cutting flooring. She had a lot of good ideas and really influenced design. She likes to get right into it and her help really speeded things up.”

— Eli Phoenix, Woodmaster Molder/Planer & TimberKing Sawmill owner, Townshend, Vermont

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Boat builder, boat restorer says, “I DO BETTER, FASTER WORK THAN MY COMPETITION THANKS TO MY WOODMASTER DRUM SANDER!”

Glen Taniguchi had been in the boat building and boat restoration business for 35 years when we spoke with him. He’s got a unique, high-end niche    woodworking business in Washington state, and said he couldn’t do it without his Woodmaster Drum Sander. Here’s Glen’s story…

Here's Glen Taniguchi with his Woodmaster Drum Sander and an example of some of the work he does as he's building and restoring high-end boats in his Washington state shop. "I couldn't do the work I do without the Woodmaster," he says. "It gives me an edge over my competition."

Here’s Glen Taniguchi with his Woodmaster Drum Sander and an example of some of the work he does as he’s building and restoring high-end boats in his Washington state shop. “I couldn’t do the work I do without the Woodmaster,” he says. “It gives me an edge over my competition.”

“I’m a self-employed professional woodworker. I create and restore high-end boats and boat interiors. I’m a subcontractor; I work for several different companies. I don’t think I could do a lot of this work without my Woodmaster Drum Sander. It gives me the edge over my competition to do things that would be impossible without it. I’m faster and do things my competition can’t. For example, I’m working on a 50-foot catamaran (twin-hulled boat) and the owner wanted a teak and maple floor. I glued it all together on a piece of plastic. When the glue dried, I was able to run the floor panels through the sander and bring it all down 1/4”. If I hadn’t had the Woodmaster, I’d have had to do it a more traditional way: laying the floor piece-by-piece and sanding it with a buff pad. That would have taken a long time and would have been very labor intensive. This way, I made panels and laid them in — just like fitting sheets of plywood.

The Woodmaster saves him time and does a better job than a hand-held sander

My Woodmaster has paid for itself. I use it on a daily basis, it helps me every day. I can sand molding, flooring, doors, and more. All I have to do is run my work through and it’s a finished piece. I save an immense amount of time and it’s a much better job than if I’d used a belt sander and a dual-action sander.

Onboard a boat, space is at a premium. Glen uses fine cabinetry skills to make the most of every square inch.

Onboard a boat, space is at a premium. Glen uses fine cabinetry skills to make the most of every square inch.

Making doors, for example: I glue them up, run them through the Woodmaster, and I’m done. I get a perfectly flat and even surface that would have taken far longer by hand. Another example is a set of cabinet doors I made for the boat I’m working on. It’s a three or four million dollar boat and the panels are all veneer. I glued burl onto a substrate of the same cherry I’m using for the frames. Then I ran the panels through the Woodmaster and brought the veneer down to the same level as the cherry frames. They look wonderful. If I’d sanded then by hand, it would have been very difficult to keep everything even.

Half an hour’s hand sanding done in just 10 minutes

What would take me hours to sand by hand I can sand in minutes. I work with less fatigue because the machine does the work. It was always kind of depressing to see a big stack of doors that would take me a day or two to get through — now I can do them in a few hours. Jobs take less time; they’re less labor intensive, less demanding, and the Woodmaster does a better job that you do.

I can multi-task now: I run a panel through the sander do something else while the Woodmaster is doing its thing. I’m working more than twice as fast. Polishing a 6” x 8’ board by hand would take at least half an hour. With the Woodmaster it takes maybe 10 minutes. I typically don’t buy Grizzly® or tools imported from China. Most of my tools are professional grade. I think it’s a good thing that Woodmaster is made in the USA. I’ve used it a lot and I’ve never had any problems with anything. Bearings and tracking are all good. It was a terrific purchase for my business.

I’d recommend Woodmaster to a friend. If you look around, you won’t find anything better on the market in the price range. For the kind of woodworking I do, this machine is perfect.”

— Glenn Taniguchi, Glen Taniguchi Woodworking, Port Ludlow WA

Glen’s doubling his productivity and YOU CAN, TOO! Get free info  and a special SALE OFFER on the Woodmaster Drum Sander!